You Are Here : Home Thursday, February 23, 2017
     
 

 

30,050 cases of child abuse were investigated and proved in the state of

Illinois in 2013 8,483 of these cases were in Cook County alone

 

 
 
 
  
 
 

 

TV  and 

 

Furniture

 

 

Tip-Overs

 

 

Mount flat-screen TVs on a wall and put older-style TVs on low, stable pieces of furniture.You wouldn't think to bring a baby home from the hospital without a car seat or have your child ride a bike without a helmet. Protecting your children from the potential risk of TV and furniture tip-overs is another important part of keeping them safe. 

The Hard Facts

Every 3 weeks a child dies from a television tipping over. Over the past 10 years, a child visited the emergency room every 45 minutes because of a TV tipping over.

Top Tips

  1. Assess the stability of the TVs in your home.
  2. Mount flat-panel TVs to the wall to prevent them from toppling off stands. Follow the manufacturer's instructions to ensure that you have a secure fit.
  3. If you have a heavier, box-style cathode ray tube (CRT) TV, place it on a low, stable piece of furniture that is appropriate for the TV's size and weight.
  4. If you no longer use your CRT TV, consider recycling it. To find a location to safely and easily recycle unwanted TVs, go to www.GreenerGadgets.org. Here are some step-by-step tips to help.
  5. Use brackets, braces or wall straps to secure unstable or top-heavy furniture to the wall.

Learn More

These tips will help get you started, but if you're interested in learning more about how to keep your family safe from TV and furniture tip-overs, read here.

 

  
 

 

The Beatitudes

 

 

Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are the meek,
for they shall possess the earth.
Blessed are they who mourn,
for they shall be comforted.
Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for justice,
for they shall be satisfied.
Blessed are the merciful,
for they shall obtain mercy.
Blessed are the clean of heart,
for they shall see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers,
for they shall be called children of God.
Blessed are they who suffer persecution for justice' sake,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are you when men reproach you,
and persecute you,
and speaking falsely, say all manner of evil against you, for My sake. 

 

 

 

  
 

                                                

Sleep Safety and

 

 

Suffocation

Lay your baby on his or her back for every sleep.There is nothing more beautiful than a sleeping baby, especially for parents who are often overtired themselves. By following a few simple tips, you can create a safer sleeping environment for your baby.

The Hard Facts

Unintentional suffocation is the leading cause of injury-related death among children under 1 year of age. Nearly three-quarters of suffocation deaths among infants are from accidental suffocation or strangulation in bed.

Top Safety Tips

  1. Because most infant suffocation occurs in the sleeping environment, babies should always sleep in a safe crib, bassinet or pack-n-play.
  2. Lay your baby on his or her back for every sleep.
  3. We know that stuffed animals, bumpers and all those cute accessories make a baby's crib seem warm and cozy. Unfortunately, they can often do more harm than good. Soft bedding can block a baby's airway during sleep. A firm mattress covered with a tight-fitting crib sheet is all you need to make your baby sleep like a baby.
  4. Room-sharing is a safer option than having your baby sleep in bed with you. Place your baby's crib, play yard or bassinet in your room for more convenient feeding and close contact.
  5. Remember to always return your baby to his or her own crib when you're ready to go back to sleep. This is tough sometimes because parents are often more tired than the babies, but it is much safer.

Learn More

Still can't sleep? It happens to all of us.  Learn more here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Image result for pictures of people of all races

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  
 

 

School

 

Bus

 

 

Safety

 

 

Walk with your kids to the bus stop and wait with them until it arrives.Taking the bus for the first time is a big step for your child. Help your kids get a gold star by following these school bus safety tips.

The Hard Facts

School buses are the safest mode of motorized transportation for getting children to and from school, but injuries can occur if kids are not careful and aware when getting on and off the bus.

Top Tips for

School Bus

Safety

  1. Walk with your kids to the bus stop and wait with them until it arrives. Tell kids to stand at least three giant steps back from the curb as the bus approaches and board the bus one at a time.
  2. Teach kids to wait for the bus to come to a complete stop before getting off and never to walk behind the bus.
  3. If your child needs to cross the street after exiting the bus, he or she should take five giant steps in front of the bus, make eye contact with the bus driver and cross when the driver indicates it's safe. Teach kids to look left, right and left again before crossing the street.
  4. Instruct younger kids to use handrails when boarding or exiting the bus. Be careful of straps or drawstrings that could get caught in the door. If your children drop something, they should tell the bus driver and make sure the bus driver is able to see them before they pick it up.
  5. Drivers should always follow the speed limit and slow down in school zones and near bus stops. Remember to stay alert and look for kids who may be trying to get to or from the school bus.  
  6. Slow down and stop if you're driving near a school bus that is flashing yellow or red lights. This means the bus is either preparing to stop (yellow) or already stopped (red), and children are getting on or off.

Learn More

Want more tips about how to keep your kids safe on or around school buses? Read more from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

 

  
 

 

 

 

 

 

  
 

       

 

 

 

Medication Safety

 

 

Keep all medications, including vitamins, out of reach and out of sight.Children are curious by nature, and it makes sense that they would be even more curious when it comes to medication. Many medications look and taste like candy. While it’s important to encourage our kids to explore and discover new things, when it comes to medication, we want to be careful to keep them safe. Here are a few tips to show you how.

The Hard Facts

Medications are the leading cause of child poisoning. In 2013, over 59,000 children were seen in emergency room for medicine poisoning. That’s one child every nine minutes. Almost all of these visits are because the child got into medicines during a moment alone.

Top Tips

 

  1. Put all medicine up and away and out of sight. In 86% of emergency department visits for medicine poisoning, the child got into medicine belonging to a parent or grandparent.
  2. Consider places where kids get into medicine. Kids get into medication in all sorts of places, like in purses and nightstands. Place purses and bags in high locations, and avoid leaving medicine on a nightstand or dresser. In 2 out of 3 emergency room visits for medicine poisoning, the medicine was left within reach of a child.
  3. Consider products you might not think about as medicine. Health products such as vitamins, diaper rash creams, eye drops and even hand sanitizer can be harmful if kids get into them. Store these items up, away and out of sight, just as you would traditional medicine.
  4. Only use the dosing device that comes with the medicine. Kitchen spoons aren’t all the same, and a teaspoon or tablespoon used for cooking won’t measure the same amount of medicine as a dosing device.
  5. Write clear instructions for caregivers about your child’s medicine. When other caregivers are giving your child medicine, they need to know what medicine to give, how much to give and when to give it. Using a medicine schedule can help with communication between caregivers.  
  6. Save the Poison Help line in your phone: 1-800-222-1222. Put the toll-free number for the Poison Control Center into your home and cell phones. You can also put the number on your refrigerator or another place in your home where babysitters and caregivers can see it. And remember, the Poison Help line is not just for emergencies, you can call with questions about how to take or give medicine.

Learn More

Medication safety is especially important for children under 5, but every parent will want to learn all they can about medication safety. Here are some additional tips to help you out.

 

 

 

  
 
 
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