You Are Here : Home Wednesday, September 28, 2016
     
 

 

30,050 cases of child abuse were investigated and proved in the state of

Illinois in 2013 8,483 of these cases were in Cook County alone

 

 
 
 
  
 


Health and Safety Tips for Children

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, accidental childhood injuries are the leading cause of death among children ages 1 to 19 years, claiming the lives of 25 children every day and sending millions more for treatment in hospital emergency rooms. Common causes of accidental childhood injuries include: drowning, falls, fires or burns, poisoning, suffocation and motor vehicle crashes. While tragic, the good news is many of these injuries are preventable. For more information and tips to keep children safe, read the DCFS publication A Helpful Guide for Parents and Caregivers in English and en español

http://www.illinois.gov/dcfs/safekids/safety/Pages/default.aspx 

To report suspected child abuse or neglect, call 1-800-25-ABUSE (252-2873)
DCFS Info and Assistance 800-232-3798 / 217-524-2029

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heatstroke

Never leave your child alone in a car.Babies and young kids can sometimes sleep so peacefully that we forget they are even there. It can also be tempting to leave a baby alone in a car while we quickly run into the store. The problem is that leaving a child alone in a car can lead to serious injury or death from heatstroke. Young children are particularly at risk, as their bodies heat up three to five times faster than an adult’s. These tragedies are completely preventable. Here’s how we can all work together to keep kids safe from heatstroke.

Hard Facts

Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children. On average, every 8 days a child dies from heatstroke in a vehicle.

Top Tips

Reduce the number of deaths from heatstroke by remembering to ACT.

A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.  

C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine. 

T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.

Learn More

Learn more about heatstroke and other areas of safety in and around cars, including car seat safety, booster seat safety and seat belt safety; driveway safety; how to avoid getting trapped in the trunk; and how to prepare teens and preteens for driving before they get behind the wheel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  
 

 

Playground

Actively supervise children on playgrounds.With active supervision and some basic safety tips, every day at the playground can be a walk in the park.

The Hard Facts

Falls are the most common type of playground injury, accounting for more than 75 percent of all playground-related injuries. Lack of or improper supervision is associated with approximately 45 percent of playground-related injuries.

Top Tips

 

  1. Check playgrounds where your children play. Look for hazards, such as rusted or broken equipment and dangerous surfaces. Report any hazards to the school or appropriate local office.
  2. Teach children that pushing, shoving or crowding while on the playground can be dangerous.
  3. Dress appropriately for the playground. Remove necklaces, purses, scarves or clothing with drawstrings that can get caught on equipment and pose a strangulation hazard. Even helmets can be dangerous on a playground, so save those for bikes.
  4. Little kids can play differently than big kids. It is important to have a separate play area for children under 5.  

 

Choose the Right Play Area Based on

Your  Child’s Age

 

  1. Ensure that children use age-appropriate playground equipment. Separate play areas for children under 5 should be available and maintained.
  2. For babies who are learning to walk, the play area should have a smooth and easy surface to walk on.
  3. If your baby has fairly good head control and can sit up with support (usually around 9 months old), give the baby (bucket-shaped) swings a try.

Ensure Safe Surfacing Beneath and

Surrounding  Playground Equipment

  1. Avoid playgrounds with non-impact absorbing surfaces, such as asphalt, concrete, grass, dirt or gravel.
  2. Recommended surface materials include: sand, pea gravel, wood chips, mulch and shredded rubber. Rubber mats, synthetic turf and other artificial materials are also safe surfaces and require less maintenance.
  3. Surfacing should be at least 12 inches deep and extend at least 6 feet in all directions around stationary equipment. Depending on the height of the equipment, surfacing may need to extend farther than 6 feet.
  4. For swings, make sure that the surfacing extends, in the back and front, twice the height of the suspending bar. So if the top of the swing set is 10 feet high, the surfacing should extend 20 feet.

 

Check That Playgrounds Are Inspected and   

Maintained by Qualified Personnel

  1. Double check with your school and child care center to make sure they have age-appropriate, well-maintained playground equipment.
  2. If there are any hazards in a public or backyard playground, report them immediately and do not allow children to use the equipment until it is safe.
  3. Report any playground safety hazards to the organization responsible for the site (e.g., school, park authority or city council).

 

 

  
 

 

 

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services and City of Harrisburg

Fire Department remind parents to keep children safe in and around cars

during two of the hottest months of the year

Harrisburg Fire Dept. to demonstrate an emergency rescue from a hot car

HARRISBURG, Ill.—The Harrisburg Fire Department and the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, in partnership with KidsandCars.org and the Harrisburg Police and Saline County Sheriff’s departments team up to demonstrate a rescue from a hot car and offer tips to parents and caregivers on how to keep children safe in and around cars during the hottest months, July and August.

The rescue demonstration will take place at 1 p.m. on Thursday, July 28 at the Harrisburg Fire Department, 100 S. Main Street.

Every year in the United States, approximately 37 children die from heatstroke inside vehicles. About one-third of these tragedies occur when a child enters a car on their own and is unable to get out.

So far this year, 19 children have died in hot cars in the United States. Recently in Illinois, a four-year-old child was hospitalized after being discovered inside a hot car in McHenry County.

"A child's body temperature rises three to five times faster than an adult's, so the risk of heat stroke, brain damage and even death is much greater for a child left in a hot car," says Illinois DCFS Director George Sheldon. "Never leave your child alone in a car, even for a minute or two. And make sure empty cars are locked at all times, so young children cannot get in by themselves and get locked in."

Illinois ranks 10th in the nation in heatstroke deaths of children, with 20 fatalities between 1990 and 2014.

"The temperature rises so rapidly in cars, we ask the public to be aware of their surroundings and if you see a child alone in a car, with the windows rolled up, get involved, call 911 immediately," says City of Harrisburg Fire Chief John Gunning. "In a big city first responders can arrive quickly but in rural areas it can take longer for us to show-up so preventing this scenario is the key to saving lives."

Follow these Safety Tips from KidsAndCars.org:

NEVER leave a child alone in or around vehicles. Not even for a minute!

Keep vehicles locked at all times, even in driveways or garages. Ask home visitors, child care providers and neighbors to do the same.

-more-

Keep car keys and remote openers out of reach of children.

Never leave children alone in or around cars; not even for a minute.

If a child goes missing, immediately check the inside passenger compartments and trunks of all vehicles in the area very carefully, even if they are locked. A child may lock the car doors after entering a vehicle on their own, but may not be able to unlock them.

If you see a child alone in a vehicle, get involved. Call 911 immediately. If the child seems hot or sick, get them out of the vehicle as quickly as possible.

Be especially careful during busy times, schedule changes and periods of crisis or holidays. This is when many tragedies occur.

"Look Before You Lock" - Get in the habit of always opening the back door to check the back seat before leaving your vehicle. Make sure no child has been left behind.

Create a reminder to check the back seat. •Put something you'll need like your cell phone, handbag, employee ID or brief case, etc., in the back seat so that you have to open the back door to retrieve that item every time you park.

•Keep a large stuffed animal in the child's car seat. When the child is placed in the car seat, place the stuffed animal in the front passenger seat. It's a visual reminder that the child is in the back seat.

•Make sure you have a strict policy in place with your childcare provider to call you if your child does not show up as planned.

"Harrisburg’s fire department works very hard to insure the safety of our citizens young and old. Our educational demonstration will show the effects of leaving a child in a hot car," says Beth Montfort, Harrisburg Safety Commissioner. "We are fortunate to have DCFS providing educational seminars to our community. As safety Commissioner I urge everyone to attend to see the great things we can do by working together."

Visit kidsandcars.org for fact sheets, safety tips, graphics, images, infographics and more to help raise awareness in your community.

DCFS receives, investigates and acts upon a report of child abuse or neglect every five minutes. Tens of thousands of children are safer thanks to those who call our Child Abuse hotline, 1-800-25-ABUSE (252-2873) each year. Working together, we can ensure a safe, loving home and brighter future for every child.

Special thanks to the Harrisburg Fire and Police departments, the Saline County Sherriff and to Opie’s Tow Service for providing the demonstration car.

100 West Randolph, 6-100 Chicago, Illinois 60601-3249 312-814-6800

312-814-8783 / TTY www.DCFS.illinois.gov

 CAR SAFETY TIPS:

  •  Keep car keys and remote openers out of reach of children.
  •  Never leave children alone in or around cars; not even for a minute.
  • If a child goes missing, immediately check the inside passenger compartments and   trunks of all vehicles in the area very carefully, even if they are locked. A child may lock the car doors after entering a vehicle on their own, but may not be able to unlock them.
  • If you see a child alone in a vehicle, get involved. Call 911 immediately. If the child seems hot or sick, get them out of the vehicle as quickly as possible.
  • Be especially careful during busy times, schedule changes and periods of crisis or holidays. This is when many tragedies occur.
  • "Look Before You Lock" - Get in the habit of always opening the back door to check the back seat before leaving your vehicle. Make sure no child has been left behind.
  • Create a reminder to check the back seat. •Put something you'll need like your cell phone, handbag, employee ID or brief case, etc., in the back seat so that you have to open the back door to retrieve that item every time you park.
  • Keep a large stuffed animal in the child's car seat. When the child is placed in the car seat, place the stuffed animal in the front passenger seat. It's a visual reminder that the child is in the back seat.
  • Make sure you have a strict policy in place with your childcare provider to call you if your child does not show up as planned.

 

 

DCFS receives, investigates and acts upon a report of child abuse or neglect every five minutes. Tens of thousands of children are safer thanks to those who call our Child Abuse hotline,

1-800-25-ABUSE (252-2873) each year. Working together, we can ensure a safe, loving home and brighter future for every child.

Special thanks to the Harrisburg Fire and Police departments, the Saline County Sherriff and to Opie’s Tow Service for providing the demonstration car.

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Fire Safety

Home fires can start and spread quickly, which is why we all need to be careful and educated when it comes to fire safety. Just a little bit of planning can make a big difference for your family.

Working smoke alarms reduce the chances of dying in a fire by nearly 50 percent.

The Hard Facts

In 2013, 334 children died in home fires. Eighty-seven percent of all fire-related deaths are due to home fires, which spread rapidly and can leave families as little as two minutes to escape once an alarm sounds. Fires are not just a problem in the United States. In 2008, nearly 61,000 children around the world died due to a fire or burn.

Top Tips

  1. Working smoke alarms reduce the chances of dying in a fire by nearly 50 percent. They are a critical first step for staying safe, but in order to be effective, they have to be working properly. For the best protection, install smoke alarms on every level of your home and in every sleeping area.
  2. Teach kids never to play with matches and lighters. Make a habit of placing these items up and away from young children.
  3. Create and practice a home fire escape plan with two ways out of every room in case of a fire. Get a stopwatch and time how fast your family can escape. The kids will love it. Here’s a handy worksheet to help get you started. 
  4. Children should know how to respond to the sound of a smoke alarm. Teach them to get low and get out when they hear it. A child who is coached properly ahead of time will have a better chance to be safe. Watch our video to learn more.
  5. Use common sense in the kitchen. Limit distractions when cooking and don’t leave a hot oven or stovetop unattended.
  6. Blow out candles before you leave the room or before you go to sleep.

http://www.safekids.org/safetytips/field_risks/fire/field_type/checklist

 

  
 

 

 

Skating/Skateboarding

Every skater should wear a helmetSkating and skateboarding can increase balance, agility, coordination and reaction time. It's also pretty fun. With plenty of practice and these safety tips, your kids can roll smart and safe.

The Hard Facts

More than 80,000 people are treated in hospital emergency rooms for skateboard-related injuries every year. Skateboarding injuries can range from mild to life-threatening. Skateboarders have been killed by head injuries and collisions with cars.

Top Tips

  1. Every skater should wear a helmet. Wrist guards, knee pads and elbow pads are a good idea for everyone, but especially for beginners. Mouth guards are good protection against broken teeth.
  2. Children should ride on smooth, dry surfaces located in a well-lit area away from traffic.
  3. Teach children to check skates and boards for problems before each use. If there are any cracked, loose or broken parts, the item should not be used until it is repaired.
  4. Teach children to minimize the impact of a fall by crouching down as they lose balance to reduce the distance to the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gun Safety

Keep guns unloaded, locked away, and safely out of reach.We need to take extra precautions when kids are in an environment where guns are present.    

The Hard Facts

It is estimated that about one third of households with childrens ages 18 and under have a gun in the home.  

Top Tips

  1. Store guns in a locked location, unloaded, out of the reach and sight of children.
  2. Store ammunition in a separate locked location, out of the reach and sight of children.
  3. Keep the keys and combinations hidden.
  4. When a gun is not in its lock box, keep it in your line of sight.
  5. Make sure all guns are equipped with effective, child-resistant gun locks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Contact Safe Kids Worldwide!

 

 

  
 

 

Lead Poisoning Prevention

 

The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) works to detect and address exposures to lead hazards. Through strategic inspections and abatement, as well as public education campaigns and testing, CDPH is leading efforts to permanently eliminate lead exposure to children. As a result, the number of children with elevated lead levels has declined from one in four tested in the late 1990’s to less than one in 100 today. Here are some facts about lead in Chicago and tips for parents and guardians to help stop children from coming into contact with lead.

What are the health effects of lead?
When young children are exposed to lead, it can affect their growth, behavior and development. When pregnant women are exposed to lead, it can affect their infants’ brain and nervous system development.

How are most children in Chicago exposed to lead?
In Chicago, children are most likely to be exposed to lead while living or staying in older homes or apartments that have lead paint. Most homes built before 1978 (when lead paint was banned in the U.S.) have some lead paint on the inside and outside of the building. When old paint cracks and peels, it makes lead dust. Lead dust is so small you cannot see it or smell it. Children may get lead poisoning from swallowing or breathing in lead dust on their hands and toys.

What are other ways children can be exposed to lead?
Lead can also be found in soil, water, pots, containers, candy, folk medicine, cosmetics made in other countries, and some toys and toy jewelry. For up-to-date information on recalls of toys and other products that contain lead you can check http://www.cpsc.gov.

What about lead in tap water?
When lead is found in household tap water, it comes from the plumbing in and near the home, not the local water supply. Water leaving the water treatment plants is free of lead. While the use of lead pipes was banned in 1986, lead can be found in older metal water taps, interior water pipes, solder connecting pipes, or pipes connecting a building to the main water pipe in the street. Lead found in tap water usually comes from the corrosion of these items. A corrosion inhibitor is added to Chicago’s drinking water, which forms a coating on the inside of water service lines; however, if water is unused for long periods of time lead from plumbing or pipes can leach into the water.

For additional information : 

http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/cdph/supp_info/food_environ/childhood_lead_poisoningpreventionandhealthyhomesprogram.html

 

For more free resources call the CDPH Lead Hotline at 312.747.LEAD (5323) or search #LeadFreeChi on Facebook and Twitter

 

  
 
 
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